Can we put away our idols?

Idols show up in the strangest places. An idol can be a beloved sports team, a movie start, musician, even an eletronic device. Where is my iPhone anyway? I have to find it before I hyperventilate!

Any person or object we tend to get obsessed with can be an idol. It can even be an idea. Perhaps you have problems giving up an idea that had run its course thirty years ago. Even churches and the old rituals we hold dear can become idols. Hymnals, Sunday best, bylaws and a tendency to keep doing things the same way can become idol. Change can become an idol, but it is much more likely the opposite, tradition and ritual gets idolized.

Be careful of idols. you may have one in the backyard and not be aware of it.

 

No daylight savings here

Why Are Women Less Likely To Become Entrepreneurs Than Men? : NPR

Businessman to two businesswomen, "That was a spectacular fail! Let's do it again!"I heard this spot from NPR yesterday on why men are more likely to be entrepreneurs than men.

Analysis finds women are less likely to be arrogant about mistakes and more likely to be humble about their achievements. Men are more likely to disregard market signals that their ideas are flawed.

Source: Why Are Women Less Likely To Become Entrepreneurs Than Men? : NPR

This surprised me. The conclusion seemed to say guys who are too arrogant to realize they made a mistake are the entrepreneurs that are most likely to succeed. Continue reading “Why Are Women Less Likely To Become Entrepreneurs Than Men? : NPR”

How do you know when criticism isn’t working?

Cartoon of a dog washing dishes and a man
Cartoon of a dog washing dishes. A man says to him, “You missed a spot.”

Criticism is the most popular way to teach someone something, isn’t it? When we someone who isn’t doing things the way we think they should, the most natural way to teach is to correct the individual.

So why do we hate criticism?

  • Because it can tear down a person if we’re not careful.
  • A small problem magnifies a huge problem.
  • Without some tact, we sound brutish and hurtful.
  • The receiver of criticism interprets it through the lens of past experiences.
    • Experience with the one who is criticizing
    • Experience with the task they’re being criticized for.

How can we correct a problem if criticism doesn’t work?

  • Be vulnerable. No one likes to receive criticism if the one sending it displays an air of perfection. People are much more receptive to criticism if we are honest about our own faults.
  • Choose your battles. Is it really worth pointing out that little spot when ninety-nine percent of the job was perfectly?
  • Point out the good more than the bad. It is easy to focus on the bad news, but who likes to hear it? A critical point goes further if most of the time we her positive comments.

How do you effectively use criticism in your business or with your kids?

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Hatching an Idea

Cartoon of a chicken and an executive

Cartoon of an executive and a chicken. The chicken says, “That’s a nice idea. Let it incubate and see what hatches.”