The Cure For Message Fatigue

At one time, you could put your ad in the phone book yellow pages and not think about it for a year. It just worked for you. A newspaper ad could last just as long. Then radio came along and you could blast the same message multiple times a day. Television made it even easier, but at least there were only three channels… until there was cable… and then the Internet. Continue reading “The Cure For Message Fatigue”

Great Class! You should turn it into a webinar | Kidzmatter Cartoon

Each day, when I go to my inbox, I have one or two offers for an amazing webinar about this marketing technique or that book publishing deal. It appears there is never a lack of any advice on any subject, whether you want it or not! 

When I drew this cartoon, I thought of the many webinars I have been convinced to join. They are a good way to get some information without the travel. A webinar is only as good as the presenter. I thought of the great teachers in my life that could have reached a wider audience if webinars were around thirty years ago.

My hope is that in every Sunday school, across the country, kids think the lesson is so good, that they think a webinar should be made out of it. Admittedly, no student has come up to me and made that suggestion. But when they do, I am ready to make the best use of Facebook Live.

I drew this for Kidzmatter Magazine.

Is the Facebook Fox Guarding the Hen House?

Breakfast Cereal and Adventure 


I heard a few months ago that Millenials aren’t eating as much breakfast cereal as previous generations because it takes too much time to prepare.

Judging by cereal commercials, I think it is because cereal causes too much adventure. It gives us too much get-up-and-go. It makes us do crazy things like skateboard, try out for the dodgeball team or hike Pikes Peak with nothing more than milk and cereal for provisions. Continue reading “Breakfast Cereal and Adventure “

Away in in a Marketed Manger

Cartoon of a Bethlehem Christmas scene with obnoxious sign

Bethlehem scene with a big sign that says, “See the newborn king here!”

There’s a song/skit I love from Stan Freburg called Green Christmas.

In the skit, it talks about how Christmas is marketed mercilessly. Let’s face it. Most Christmas marketing is just cheesy. Any time you take a meaningful story and use it to sell something, it doesn’t come across as genuine.

I’ve been thinking a lot about that because, well, I don’t want to be cheesy. I like content marketing because it adds value more than sells. But where do you draw the line? When does content marketing become cheesy? When it becomes about the product instead of the customer, I suppose.

Still, that can be difficult to discern when there is a sales quota.