Hold the hummus, please!

Cartoon of a pastor saying to a man, "If you think it needs, hummus, you're missing the point of communion."

There are some traditions that shouldn’t be messed with. In a church, it’s probably okay to allow coffee in a sanctuary. (I know I’m biased on this one). If you are in the middle of the deep southern United States, and the church can afford air conditioning, it’s probably a good idea to allow that change to happen. But one needs to be prudent when making changes.  Continue reading “Hold the hummus, please!”

How do you keep change relevant?

Cartoon of two men staring a a church steeple with a windmill attached. One says, "It may be more 'green,' but I prefer the older steeple."
Copyright 2017 Kidzmatter Magazine

Often, churches and church people get a reputation for being resistant to change. “Worship Wars” continue as those who love traditional hymns duke it out with lovers of contemporary styles of worship. Changing an old chair in the lobby can be controversial if it was dedicated in memory of a dearly departed saint during the Eisenhower Administration. Adding a little fresh paint and new carpet to a classroom can cause consternation along with a little weeping and gnashing of teeth. Continue reading “How do you keep change relevant?”

Be the Change: Sermon Notes

Sermon sketch notes on "Be the Change," by Richard Triplett
Copyright ©2017. Sermon Copyright Richard Triplett

On Sunday, September 2, 2017, at Salem Church of God, Pastor Richard Triplett preached on how to Be the Change. My sketch notes from the sermon are above.

The sermon was based on the Book of Nehemiah.

The big takeaway I received from the sermon was that in spite of the massive amount of transformation our world has faced in a few short decades, most of us still fear when things begin changing. It takes a certain amount of brokenness to make change possible. The saddest situation may be when we insist on things staying the same even when we admit it is broken. 

Can we put away our idols?

Idols show up in the strangest places. An idol can be a beloved sports team, a movie start, musician, even an eletronic device. Where is my iPhone anyway? I have to find it before I hyperventilate!

Any person or object we tend to get obsessed with can be an idol. It can even be an idea. Perhaps you have problems giving up an idea that had run its course thirty years ago. Even churches and the old rituals we hold dear can become idols. Hymnals, Sunday best, bylaws and a tendency to keep doing things the same way can become idol. Change can become an idol, but it is much more likely the opposite, tradition and ritual gets idolized.

Be careful of idols. you may have one in the backyard and not be aware of it.

 

Yes, Change is Hard – Inc. Magazine Article

4 o'clock shift at the Ford Motor Company
4 o’clock shift at the Ford Motor Company (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

This morning, I read this Inc. Article on making change happen within a company.

Change Is Hard: 8 Great Ways to Make Sure You’re Constantly Evolving – Inc.

I have witnessed how hard change is at a newer as well as older company. And I have also had the privilege working for a company where change was the only thing constant. All the companies I’ve worked for wanted change but discovered pushback from customers as well as employees. It is ironic that the very change that will benefit customers can be rejected by those same consumers.

Whether you are a leader or follower, change is vital for companies and people to thrive. As the article says, it begins with you. It also takes lots of clear communication to explain why the change is needed and how it will benefit stakeholders in the long run.

One thing the article touched on was how the messy middle affects change. We talked about that in one of my MBA classes. A change initiative feels exciting in the beginning. But when you are in the middle of the change, it is so tempting to go back to the old ways. It takes a lot of determination, self-examination, and clear communication to make change happen.