Safety is the best policy

Cartoon of a boy with a cast and a teacher

Cartoon of a boy with a cast. He says to a teacher, “Do you want to see the reason you had to rewrite your safety policy?”

Should you spy on your kids?

Cartoon of a drone following two boys. One boy says, "My mom doesn't trust us!"Drones are making it easier to take pictures whether people are wanting it or not. I saw a drone hovering the other day and wondered what it would be like if a parent used one to continually keep track of his children.

So if you had the ability to continually spy on your kids, would you do it? When does it become an issue of trust vs. safety?

Taking Playground Safety Seriously

Cartoon of a business man jumping off a swing

Cartoon of a business man jumping off a swing. The caption says, “Playground tester, Cyrus Kolter demonstrates his graceful form as he jumps off a swing.”

My dad is an insurance guy. He spent his career as an underwriter. He sees safety hazards wherever he goes. Sometimes, that didn’t make trips to the playground fun. I didn’t realize the curly slides could be such a death trap.

All the same, he taught me to pay attention to my surroundings. Too many times, we assume a playground, a school or any public place is safe. While officials like Cyrus Kolter do their best to make these places attractive and without hazards, It’s always a good idea to pay attention and survey the area instead of plunging right in to that merry-go-round of misery.

Have fun, people! But play it safe too!

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Cartoon: Send Help

Cartoon of a man with his hands glued together

Cartoon of a man holding his hands together. He says to a phone, “Send help! I was trying the suggest craft for class and I glued my hands together.”

I drew this cartoon for K! Magazine.

Great Heights

Cartoon of a girl scolding a kitten. She says, "Come down from there! Are you trying to get yourself killed?"

Cartoon of a girl scolding a kitten. She says, “Come down from there! Are you trying to get yourself killed?”

Heights and obstacles are a matter of perspective, aren’t they? Whenever a child is convinced an obstacle is just too much for them, I need to remember it really does look as big to them as they imagine it. Part of the challenge is to convince a student they can overcome an obstacle without belittling or minimizing their fear.

How do you get a child to overcome an an obstacle in a respectful, encouraging way? I’d love to hear your thoughts.

I drew this for Illustration Friday. This week’s word is “heights.”