Tuesday with Morrie: Five Important things

I have been taking a leadership class. Last night, I, along with two of my classmates presented the first half of the book Tuesdays With Morrie. I drew a mind map of the first five Tuesdays Mitch Albom discussed with Morrie Schwartz.

Mind Map of the first five topics in "Tuesdays with Morrie"

 

The mind map goes over the first five topics Morrie and Mitch discuss:

  • The world
  • Feeling sorry for yourself
  • Regrets
  • Death
  • Family

These are topics you don’t normally talk about at work. But I found through the discussion that leadership is more than getting things done and motivating the office. We bring our whole selves to work and what we think and feel about important topics affect everything we do.

So here’s the question we gave the class: If you knew you were dying, what would you tell a loved one, or a coworker about one of these topics?

What would you say?

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Why have a book without pictures?

What can I say? Pictures make a book more interesting. And I bet you agree with me too. It’s sad that society reasons you must have nothing but text on a page. Don’t get me wrong. Book design is an art unto itself and takes a lot of work to make it look perfect. But still, books without pictures have always looked boring and inaccessible.

If picture-less books are less effective, then why aren’t there more illustrated books?

Cartoon of a boy with a book and some popcorn. He says, A book without pictures is like popcorn without salt.

What can I say? Pictures make a book more interesting. And I bet you agree with me too. It’s sad that society reasons you must have nothing but text on a page. Don’t get me wrong. Book design is an art unto itself and takes a lot of work to make it look perfect. But still, books without pictures have always looked boring and inaccessible.

Continue reading “Why have a book without pictures?”

How to tell if your child is a potential author

Cartoon of a dad reading a bedtime story to a son

Cartoon of a dad reading a bedtime story to his son. The son says, “You can stop reading now. This story lacks depth.”

Cartoon: Good Friday

Cartoon of boy reading to a girl.

Cartoon of boy reading to girl. The boy says, “Wait! That’s the Friday part. Wait until you hear the Sunday part!”

Continue reading “Cartoon: Good Friday”

Social Reading

Joe Wikert has a great post on the future of social reading. He states how many cynics believe reading will always be a solitary event, while he asserts great startups like ReadSocial and BookShout are making social reading attractive.

In many ways, this is a nod to the past when storytelling was a social event that would be held around a campfire. The storyteller would weave history and tall tales while the audience would give their approval. It was part history and part drama.

Until recently, literacy was only for the well-educated. If you wanted to hear God’s word, you went to church and heard the pastor or priest read from scripture. Even if you could read, Bibles were too large to be toted around. It was only when books became portable that reading could be a solitary event.

Technology is allowing us to become social readers again. We can be part of a larger community that shares our reading interests. It’s an interesting world we live in!