More Jelly Beans Prayer

cartoon of a mom and boy with jelly bean basket. The boy says, "I had a jelly bean prayer that you would buy more jelly beans."
I love jelly beans. There! I’ve said it! I loved them ever since I bit into my first licorice jelly bean. They gave me great satisfaction because I soon learned many kids didn’t like them. So I would happily collect all the black licorice jelly beans while my classmates would gladly hand them over. Continue reading “More Jelly Beans Prayer”

Prayer and Going Back to School

Cartoon of a mom and son. The disgruntled son says,

It can be tough to have faith that can move mountains when you have to go back to school. I probably prayed a prayer similar to the boy’s prayer in this cartoon when I was in elementary school.

School was stressful for me. I never knew if my pencil was really a Number Two Pencil. If I wasn’t so nervous, I may have had the wits to actually check the inscription on the pencil. I should’ve realized almost all school pencils are number two pencils. If I just got that through my head, maybe school wouldn’t have been so stressful. Then again, maybe I should have just prayed about my stress!

I drew this for the Church of God Newsletter.

Four thousand cartoons and a drone

Cartoon of parents and a boy. The dad says, "Yes, it would make your summer break interesting, but you're still not getting a drone!"

 

This is my official four-thousandth cartoon. At least it is as far as my record keeping is concerned. There are thousands of others in my sketchbook that have never been numbered.

I began numbering the ones I wanted to finish about twenty-five years ago. So that’s about one cartoon every two days. When I began this journey, it didn’t occur to me what number I would reach. Who knows where it will all end.

What I do know is that if you have a large project, It’s best to break it down into little pieces instead of tackling it all at once. Whether it’s drawing cartoons or saving up to purchase a drone, it all takes a series of little steps to reach your goal.

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What will kids be like in 100 years?

My youngest child with be eighteen years-old in a few weeks. That has me thinking about the future. Today’s kids have electronic gadgets I would have never dreamed about when my brother and I were playing Star Trek in our dad’s old pickup truck. It never ended well for our dad. When we pushed the old Chevy into warp speed, we frequently flooded the engine.

My brother and I where sure we’d have flying cars when we were adults. Yes, we’re still waiting on that one. Now that I have driven for thirty years, I realize, flying vehicles in the hands of some people would be quite the disaster. But driverless cars? Who but Google would’ve though about that?

Will my great grandkids see Star Trek type technology in their life time? Will they grab a snack from a 3D printer? Will Google still be around or will they think of Internet search engines the same way we look at Model T Fords?

Here are my predictions for what kids will be like in the year 2114:

  • Kids will still need a loving home
  • Kids will still need boundaries and they will test them
  • Kids will take the newest, most well-designed gadget and find a way to break it.

We may not be able to predict all the circumstances our descendants will face in one hundred years, but we can be sure kids will still be kids, and good parents and teachers will be sorely needed.

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Complementing a child goes a long way

Cartoon of a teacher saying to a student, "This is a great story. You should copyright it!"
(c) kevin@kevinspear.com

Cartoon of a happy teacher and student. The teacher says, “This is a great story. You should copyright it.”

It breaks my heart when I hear about an author who almost didn’t take up his craft because an English teacher once told her that she was a terrible writer. But it is inspiring to hear of those who heard that discouragement, yet overcame it and are authors today.

It is a shame when discouragement comes out of our mouths. I am as guilty as anyone else of spewing criticism to others. Unfortunately, it is too easy to do that in this world.

But a complement goes a long way. My fourth grade teacher encouraged me to consider drawing when complemented my part in a poster. I didn’t think of myself as an artist until that moment.

Be sure to give a sincere complement to a child when you have a chance. You never know how it will change his life.

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